Most Important Google Search Syntax

In Google, as with any search engine, sometimes you can easily find what you are looking for and then there are those times you can’t. It has been estimated that Google’s search index has over 23,633,010,000 results.  That’s a lot to navigate through it you need to find a particular item. Wouldn’t it be easier if someone would show you advanced search techniques to show you how to really drill down to exactly what you want? Today is your lucky day!

Below is a list of all the Google syntax queries you can use to find exactly what you want:

Search Google Syntax Queries
Web Search allinanchor:, allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, cache:, define:, filetype:, id:, inanchor:, info:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:, link:, phonebook:, related:, site:
Image Search allintitle:, allinurl:, filetype:, inurl:, intitle:, site:
Groups allintext:, allintitle:, author:, group:, insubject:, intext:, intitle:
Directory allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, ext:, filetype:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:
News allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:, location:, source:
Product Search allintext:, allintitle:

 

allinanchor:

If you start your query with allinanchor: Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. For example, [allinanchor: best internet marketing] will return only pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contain the words “best,” “internet,” and “marketing.”

allintext:

If you start your query with allintext: Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the text of the page. For example, [allintext: seo services ] will return only pages in which the words “seo” and “services” appear in the text of the page.

allintitle:

If you start your query with allintitle: Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the title. For example, [allintitle: internet marketing] will return only documents that contain the words “internet” and “marketing” in the title.

allinurl:

If you start your query with allinurl: Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the URL. For example, [allinurl: google faq] will return only documents that contain the words “google” and “faq” in the URL, such as “www.google.com/help/faq.html”.

author:

If you include author: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to include newsgroup articles by the author you specify. The author can be a full or partial name or email address. For example, [ seo author:john author:doe ] or [ seo author:doe@someaddress.com ] return articles that contain the word “seo” written by John Doe or doe@someaddress.com.

cache:

The query cache:url will display Google’s cached version of a web page, instead of the current version of the page. For example, [ cache:www.espn.com] will show Google’s cached version of the ESPN home page.

define:

If you start your query with define: Google shows definitions from pages on the web for the term that follows. This advanced search operator is useful for finding definitions of words, phrases, and acronyms. For example, [ define: seo ] will show definitions for “SEO”.

ext:

This is an undocumented alias for filetype:

filetype:

If you include filetype:suffix in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages whose names end in suffix. For example, [ seo evaluation filetype:pdf ] will return Adobe Acrobat pdf files that match the terms “seo” and “evaluation.”

link:

The query link:URL shows pages that link back to that URL. For example, to find pages that point to ESPN’s home page, enter:[ link:www.espn.com ]

location:

If you include location: in your query on Google News, only articles from the location you specify will be returned. For example, [seo location:india ] will show articles that match the term “seo” from sites in India. Many other country names work; try them and see.

movie:

If you include movie: in your query, Google will find movie-related information.

phonebook:

If you start your query with phonebook: Google shows all public U.S. residence telephone listings (name, address, phone number) for the person you specify.

related:

The query related:URL will list web pages that are similar to the web page you specify. For instance, [related:www.consumerreports.org ] will list web pages that are similar to the Consumer Reports home page.

site:

If you include site: in your query, Google will restrict your search results to the site or domain you specify.

source:

If you include source: in your query, Google News will restrict your search to articles from the news source with the ID you specify. For example, [ election source:new_york_times ] will return articles with the word “election” that appear in the New York Times.

weather

If you enter a query with the word weather and a city or location name, if Google recognizes the location, the forecast will appear at the top of the results page. Otherwise, your results will usually include links to sites with the weather conditions and forecast for that location.

source: highervisibility

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